List of indie book reviewers released

Christy Pinheiro-Silva of PassKey Publications has created “The Official Indie Book Reviewer List: A Handy Reference Guide for Self-Published Authors and Small Publishers”.
You can buy it at www.stepbystepselfpublishing.net

Here’s part of Christy’s Introduction, explaining this list:

“After two years of hosting the Step-By-Step Self-Publishing for Profit website (www.stepbystepselfpublishing.net), we’ve decided to put an “official” indie book reviewer list together. I’ve contacted all the indie book reviewers on the website and asked them questions about what type of genres they accept, which genres they don’t like, and their pet peeves about blogging in general. This book is designed to be a reference for independent publishers and self-published authors
who need free (or very inexpensive) publicity and promotion for their books. All of the websites and bloggers in this book do not charge a fee for book reviews. A limited number allow advertising or other promotional tools. We hope this will be a valuable resource for the growing number of authors who choose to self-publish and want to know where to find reviewers interested in reading their books.”

“We sent out detailed questionnaires, asking the reviewers to state their genre preferences and give us a detailed description of their blogs. We’ve had a full range of responses, from bloggers who accept all types of raunchy Erotica, to bloggers who only accept Christian lit. We’ve met bloggers who are “PR Friendly” (which usually means they accept advertising) to bloggers who think that accepting any form of payment is unethical. Personally I am ambivalent on this issue. Book reviews are hard work and maintaining a daily blog is not easy. Authors must understand that reviewing books regularly takes a lot of time and anything that helps these blogs stay active is a good thing. Authors and publishers want their
books to make money, so we aren’t going to begrudge anyone else’s attempt to make a few bucks.”

“There are some sites that do book reviews for a fee, namely Kirkus Discoveries and Clarion Reviews. This practice is widely used but frowned upon as expensive and unnecessary. If you can get someone to review your book for free, why pay $500 or more for a service like Kirkus to do it?”

Great work, Christy!

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